Tech. Sgt. Alyssa C. Gibson
Secretary of the Air Force Public Affairs

Heather Wilson swore in as the 24th Secretary of the Air Force in May 2017 with a clear-eyed view on the task at hand.

Final Interview with the 24th Secretary of the Air Force, Heather Wilson. Video // SAF PA

“When Secretary of Defense Jim Mattis asked me to serve as the Secretary of the Air Force I said, “You know, Mr. Secretary, I’m not the kind of gal who just cuts ribbons on new dormitories, that’s not me. But if you want somebody who’s going to help to try to solve problems and make it better, not just different, but better, then that’s what I’ll do.”

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Secretary of Defense Jim Mattis administers the oath of office for Secretary of the Air Force Heather Wilson during her swearing-in ceremony May 16, 2017, at the Pentagon in Washington, D.C. To her left is her husband, retired U.S. Air Force Col. Jay Hone. Wilson is a U.S. Air Force Academy graduate and former New Mexico representative. She will be responsible for organizing, training and equipping 660,000 active-duty, Guard, Reserve and civilian Airmen, as well as managing a $132 billion budget. DOD photo // Air Force Tech. Sgt. Brigitte N. Brantley

Before representing New Mexico’s first district as a member of Congress and being the president of South Dakota School of Mines & Technology, Wilson was an Air Force officer. During her seven years of service in the 1980s, she served as a planner, political advisor and a defense policy arms control director. Her husband, Jay Hone, served in the 1970s as an Air Force lawyer and went on to retire from the service. For them, Air Force business was family business, and there was work to be done.

Wilson said her responsibilities as SecAF were broader than those of any other executive position she held…she was obligated to the welfare of 685,000 Total Force Airmen and their families, and the oversight of a $138 billion annual budget. Aware of the devastating toll sequestration and 27 years of combat had taken on the force, Wilson called on her wingmen – Air Force Chief of Staff Gen. David L. Goldfein and Chief Master Sgt. of the Air Force Kaleth O. Wright – to help devise and oversee plans to restore the readiness of the force, cost-effectively modernize, and revitalize Air Force squadrons. It would take an Air Force-wide effort to get after these challenges, and the senior leaders’ message to the Airmen was clear.

“We trust you…we trust that you’ve been well-trained,” Wilson said. “We will try to give you a clear set of mission parameters and the skills and the abilities to get after the job. Don’t wait to be told what to do…see the problems around you and just get after them. Don’t wait for us.”

That’s one of the things Wilson said she’s appreciated most about the “intelligent, capable and committed” U.S. Air Force Airmen – their unique way of handling business.

“I like the fact that Airmen don’t always do exactly what they’re told in the way they were told to do it because they come up with better answers to complex, difficult problems,” she said.

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Secretary of the Air Force Heather Wilson speaks to 2nd Maintenance Squadron Airmen during a tour at Barksdale Air Force Base, La., Nov. 14, 2017. During her visit, Wilson visited Barksdale’s bomber hydraulic centralized repair facility. The newly derived unit, which has only been at Barksdale since 2015, is able to accommodate assets from the B-52 Stratofortress, the B-1 Lancer and the B-2 Spirit. The new facility saved Air Force Global Strike Command over 13$ million dollars so far in 2017. U.S. Air Force photo // Senior Airman Mozer O. Da Cunha

And for the issues that required Headquarters-level intervention, Wilson relied on her wingman for assistance.

“The law says the service secretary has all of the authority to run the service, but the chief of staff has most of the influence,” Wilson said. “There are very few decisions that I make without asking for his advice, and he freely gives that advice. If I know we have a difference in opinion I always want to understand why, and as a result I think we have a very close, professional working relationship, and that is transmitted to the force. We’ve been forging vicious partnerships between both the civilian leadership and the military leadership of the service, and it’s been very effective.”

After two years, the results of Wilson’s empowering leadership are palpable.

“There have been significant advances in the Air Force’s ability to win any fight, any time, including a more than 30% increase in readiness, she said. “We’ve also gone a long way in cost-effective modernization and taking the authorities we’ve been given to buy things faster and smarter. We’ve stripped 100 years out of Air Force procurement in the last year…we’re streamlining the schedules to get capability to the warfighter faster.”

With a shared focus on revitalizing squadrons, Wilson and Goldfein also returned power, time and support back to the squadron by removing redundant policies, revamping personnel evaluations, updating professional military training and extending high year of tenure.

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Secretary of the Air Force Heather Wilson testifies during a House Armed Services Committee hearing in Washington D.C., April 2, 2019. The committee convened to discuss fiscal year 2020 budget requests with the Air Force and Army senior leaders. U.S. Air Force Photo // Wayne Clark

On a larger scale, Wilson worked with the Secretaries of the Army and Navy to make the process of transferring duty stations easier for military families. Together, they wrote letters to governors across the United States to address two issues members said matter most – the quality of public schools near military installations and reciprocity of licensure.

“We told them, ‘We want you to know when we make basing decisions in the future we’re going to take these things into account,’” she said. “We had some leverage, and I’ve been really pleased at the number of states that have passed laws related to reciprocity of licensure.

“I hope the changes that we’ve made to assignment policies at Talent Marketplace has helped to make a difference, to give families more control and choice over their lives, and recognize that they’re balancing family life with service life,” she continued. “And I hope that ultimately that’ll mean we keep more highly capable Airmen in the service for longer.”

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Secretary of the Air Force Heather Wilson speaks with Airmen during a farewell interview at the Pentagon in Arlington, Virginia, May 8, 2019. Wilson announced her resignation in March, having accepted the role as president of the University of Texas at El Paso. U.S. Air Force photo // Tech. Sgt. Robert Barnett

Though her tenure as SecAF is at its end, the impact of her laser-focused efforts may reverberate throughout the service for years to come.

“I came here to try to make things better,” Wilson said. “Life’s short, time’s short, so you got to make a difference today. I hope people have a better quality of life and quality of service because we were here. And I hope that the Air Force is better because I served.”